Login

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Vasquez, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-29T20:50:26Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-29T20:50:26Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/204086
dc.description.abstract In this historical and ethnographic analysis of the Bracero Program, I argue that despite the program’s official termination, the framework of the program remained in place. As such when the state allowed capital to extend its invitation of residency to the bracero family, the structural frameworks of racial segregation, national exclusion and labor exploitation were able to funnel migrant children into the agricultural industry, producing a new generation of unofficial braceros. Drawing on the historical accounts of the Bracero Program as well as the oral histories of former braceros, this project addresses the conditions under which Mexican migrants labored and lived, as well as the social and structural frameworks that were imposed upon them as racial and national outsiders. Drawing on the personal experiences of the adult-children of former braceros who grew up in agricultural labor, I argue that when the state allowed growers to offer permanent residency to the bracero family, the structural frameworks of racial segregation, national exclusion and labor exploitation produced an unofficial continuation of the program, an in turn, aided in the production of a permanent racial underclass. en_US
dc.format.extent vii, 164 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher San Francisco State University en_US
dc.rights Copyright by Stephanie Vasquez, 2018 en_US
dc.source AS36 2018 WOMST .V37
dc.title The politics of disposability : the generational effects of the Bracero Program en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.contributor.department Women and Gender Studies en_US


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


My Account

RSS Feeds