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dc.contributor.author Bianchi, Gionata
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-14T16:00:42Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/196002
dc.description.abstract Particle size reduction in geophysical granular flows is caused by abrasion and fragmentation. Controls on fragmentation are not well understood. In this study, I used laboratory experiments to measure fragmentation probability and resulting fragment sizes, to calibrate a numerical model that can predict how particle size distributions evolve with travel distance in laboratory drums and in the field. Using free-fall single-particle experiments with granodiorite, basalt and serpentinite samples, I found that fragmentation probability is a power function of impact energy, with an exponent that varies between 0.66 and 1.03 for different rock types. I also found that fragment size distributions can be represented with a single power relationship for each rock type, independent of impact energy. These results were used to calibrate a numerical code that simulates the production and size evolution of sediment particles by fragmentation and abrasion. I tested the code using particle size measurements from rotating drum experiments that physically model granular flows in nature. In a related project, I documented down-valley fining of debris flow deposits at Inyo Creek, California, which may result from particle fragmentation during high energy particle interactions. en_US
dc.format.extent ix, 83 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher San Francisco State University en_US
dc.rights Copyright by Gionata Bianchi, 2017 en_US
dc.source AS36 2017 GEOL .B53
dc.title Particle size reduction in geophysical granular flows : the role of rock fragmentation en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.embargoterms 6 months en_US
dc.date.embargountil 2018-03-13T16:00:42Z
dc.contributor.department Geosciences en_US


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